Wednesday, June 27, 2012

"It's better to play than do nothing." Confucus

Callie Roberts lives on the same street in a London suburb as her friend, Suzy.

Both women have young children and share childcare duties. Callie's daughter, Rae, age five, has a heart condition and can't exert herself.

Callie is a single mom who is unemployed at the start of the story. The other women in the neighborhood seem cold toward her and don't include Rae in any of their children's functions.

Suzy's husband has a good job and Suzy often treats Callie to outings in London or has her over for dinner.

When Callie's former boss offers her her old job back, she's overjoyed but hesitates to tell Suzy for fear that it might effect their friendship.

Then, a new neighbor moves in, Debs Ridwell. She's a bit older and there's something in her past that she worries about. She gets a job at Rae's school as an art teacher.

The author does a commendable job in describing these women and the nuances of their daily lives. They live lives where love and emotions are somewhat lacking and all of them seem unsecure in some way.

We can see and empathize the feelings of little Rae who wants nothing more than to be included with the other children and feel the heartake for Callie when this doesn't happen.

When Callie begins her job and has to rely on others to care for Rae after school, there is a premonition of some catastrophe that is to follow.  It's as if Janet Leigh was going into the shower at the motel in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, the reader wants to shout some warning.

I enjoyed the story and learning about these women. They were portrayed in a realistic manner that made the story interesting to read.

2 comments:

Man of la Book said...

Excellent review Mike. Our two kids run my wife and me ragged. I don't understand how single parents do it.

http://www.ManOfLaBook.com

Michael Draper said...

Man of la Book, I know what you mean, my son and his wife have a four year old and two year old and they sure keep their parents running.

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